Interesting Perfect Or Near-Perfect Games

I had a little extra time on my hands and decided to use my Retrosheet database to find some interesting near perfect or actually perfect games.

Perfect Games:

August 6th, 1967 – Minnesota Twins – 2, Boston Red Sox – 0

Pitcher: Dean Chance

Dean Chance pitched five perfect innings, but the game was called due to rain. Since it was past five innings, this still counts as an official game.

April 21, 1984 – Montreal Expos – 4, St. Louis Cardinals – 0

Pitcher: David Palmer

David Palmer and the Montreal Expos were in the same situation here. The perfect game was called due to rain after five innings.

One hit:

September 13, 1987 – Chicago White Sox – 2, Seattle Mariners – 0

Pitcher: Floyd Bannister

The Seattle Mariners had one hit – a single to left field with two outs in the third inning. The runner was thrown out attempting to stretch the single into a double. This was the only base runner in the game for the Mariners.

No hits or walks, but still not perfect:

August 18, 1960 – Milwaukee Braves – 1, Philadelphia Phillies – 0

Pitcher:Lew Burdette

Base runners: Only one base runner for the Phillies in this game – a hit by pitch in the top of the 5th. The very next batter grounded into a double play, allowing Burdette to face the minimum 27 batters.

September 10th, 1967 – Chicago White Sox – 6, Detroit Tigers – 0

Pitcher: Joe Horlen

Base runners: There were two base runners for the Tigers in this game: a hit by pitch in the top of the 3rd inning and a reached base on error (E3) in the top of the 5th inning. The very next batter after the error grounded into a double play, allowing Horlen to only face 28 batters.

July 20th, 1970 – Los Angeles Dodgers – 5, Philadelphia Phillies – 0

Pitcher: Bill Singer

Base runners: The Phillies had two base runners in this game: a hit by pitch in the top of the 1st inning and a reached base on error (E1) in the top of the 7th inning. The runner who reached base in the 1st inning advanced to 2nd base on a bad pickoff throw by Singer. There were two base runners and two errors, both created by the pitcher himself.

July 19th, 1974 – Cleveland Indians – 4, Oakland Athletics – 0

Pitcher: Dick Bosman

Base runners: The Athletics only had one base runner in this game. He reached on a throwing error by the pitcher in the top of the 4th inning.

June 27th, 1980 – Los Angeles Dodgers – 8, San Francisco Giants – 0

Pitcher: Jerry Reuss

Base runners: The Giants had a runner reach base on an error (E6) in the first inning. They did not have another base runner for the rest of the game.

September 26th, 1983 – St. Louis Cardinals – 3, Montreal Expos – 0

Pitcher: Bob Forsch

Base runners: The Expos had two base runners in the game, both reaching in the top of the 2nd inning. With two outs, Forsch plunked a batter. The very next batter reached on an error (E4).

August 15th, 1990 – Philadelphia Phillies – 6, San Francisco Giants – 0

Pitcher: Terry Mulholland

Base runners: Mulholland had a perfect game through six innings, when the third baseman threw wildly, allowing the runner to reach on an error. The very next batter grounded into a double play, allowing Mulholland to face the minimum 27 batters in the game.

June 10th, 1997 – Florida Marlins – 9, San Francisco Giants – 0

Pitcher: Kevin Brown

Base runners: Kevin Brown had a perfect game through seven and two-thirds innings, when he hit Marvin Benard. This was the only base runner he allowed in the game.

July 10th, 2009 – San Francisco Giants – 8, San Diego Padres – 0

Pitcher: Jonathan Sanchez

Base runners: Chase Headley reached on an error (E5) after seven and one-third perfect innings from Sanchez. While the next batter was batting, Sanchez threw a wild pitch and Headley advanced to second base. That was all the action though, as Sanchez was able to finish the game without allowing another base runner.

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